The 19th Inter-university Charrette is called FIELDS OF KNOWLEDGE: TOWARDS A UNIVERSITY OF THE STREETS, and it invites young designers to think about the relationship between the university campus and the city in light of contemporary ways of living and especially of the movement of information through relationships, political actions, and new educational contexts. Registration details are available on the 2014 Charrette website.

FIELDS OF KNOWLEDGE: TOWARDS A UNIVERSITY OF THE STREETS is co-organized by the CCA and Université de Montréal in collaboration with McGill University, Université du Québec à Montréal, and with the participation of Université Laval, Concordia University, Carleton University, Ryerson University and University of Toronto. Since 1996, Charrette information has been disseminated through websites that archive all competition entries as well as jury comments on winning projects.

The launch of the Charrette will take place at the CCA with a keynote by Alain Carle on 13 March 2014 at 4h30 pm and will be streamed live.

The Inter-university Charrette, inaugurated in 1994, brings together students and recent graduates from a range of design disciplines to solve a problem relating to the urban environment. Participants come from programs in architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, graphic design, environmental design and design art at various universities. The Charrette takes place over three days.

Past charrettes

2013 : Transmutation
2011: Liquid City
2010: Alterotopia
2009: Nourishing the City
2008: Housing Crisis in the North
2007: Recréer la rue comme un monde
2006: 4e vie du bassin Peel
2005: Carrée des arts
2004: Festival Palace
2003: Prospect
2002: Improbable Places
2001: Post-modern Pathologies
2000: Movement, Landscape and Place: The Footbridge
1999: Urban Follies
1998: A Place in the Public Eye
1997: Signs of Life: Outdoor Advertising in the Urban Landscape
1996: Land Into Landscape


Event information:
13 March, 4:30 pm, to 16 March 2014


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Charrette