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Journeys and translation

How do ideas and material things related to architecture change during their journeys and how do these changes affect our environment? By looking at the transfer of knowledge from one place to another and the physical reconfiguration of communities over time, it’s possible to uncover the process of translation that takes place during the global movement of architectural issues.

Article 7 of 12

The Good Cause

An interview with Gerd Junne

“How to coordinate activities of many international actors with very divergent interests, with the many different local interests that should be decisive in what takes place?”

Post-conflict cities share many problems, such as spontaneous construction and a lack of strong civil governance. Under these conditions, even well-intended projects risk fixing inequalities permanently or introducing new inequalities in the built environment. Gerd Junne discusses some immediate and long-term challenges of post-conflict situations, and a role for architecture in addressing these challenges.

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Gerd Junne holds the Chair in International Relations at the University of Amsterdam. This discussion took place in the context of the exhibition The Good Cause: Architecture of Peace, organized by the Netherlands Architecture Institute and presented at the CCA in 2011.

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