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Let us assure you

Architecture can often find itself in service of a message: this institution is trustworthy or forward-thinking; that individual or company is powerful; here is a world you want to buy into. This topic looks at examples of the built environment as a kind of public relations strategy. In unpacking the ways that architecture—and, equally importantly, representations of it—lays claims and exerts influence, we might better understand the versions of reality that architecture proposes to us.

Article 12 of 16

Realism and Illusion

Photographs by Catherine Wagner

One of the notions I worked with was the idea that Disney sets perfect the art of illusion. My photographs act exponentially to add yet another layer to the simulacrum of heightened reality. Whether I was in Paris, Tokyo, Florida or Los Angeles the sets were vacant of cultural clues.
— Catherine Wagner, 1997

In 1995, as part of the development of the exhibition The Architecture of Reassurance, we commissioned Catherine Wagner to photograph the four Disney theme parks (in Anaheim, California; Orlando, Florida; Tokyo; and Paris). The resulting photos were also shown in the 1997 exhibition Realism and Illusion.

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