Hubert Damisch: Erase Architecture?

Talk, in French, Paul Desmarais Theatre, 8 May 2003
. . .
Hubert Damisch: Effacer l'architecture?
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Hubert Damisch examines Blur—the cloud building created by New York architects Diller + Scofidio on lake Neuchâtel in Switzerland, which is the most recent and radical expression of the desire for fluidity and evanescence in architecture—and the consequences that it might have on the future of structural thought. Damisch examines the desire to join two materials as antagonistic as steel and mist in one construction, as well as the way to create a structure of clouds.

Hubert Damisch is Professor Emeritus of the History and Theory of Art at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris. He has published articles on Mondrian, Pollock, Gropius, Dubuffet, Viollet-Le-Duc, Giotto, Cézanne, and Duchamp, among others. His publications include Théorie du nuage: Pour une histoire de la peinture (1972), L’Origine de la perspective (1987), Le jugement de Paris (1992), and Traité du trait (1995), as well as several volumes of collected essays.

Hubert Damisch was a CCA Mellon Senior Fellow in 2003.

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