Unravelling the Digital Landscape

Lecture, in English, Paul Desmarais Theatre, 6 October 2016, 6pm

In this lecture, Christophe Girot discusses digital landscape models:

A quiet revolution has taken place in digital landscape design and analysis over the past decade, caused by the introduction of digital point-cloud models. The scope and precision of these digital landscape models, created with terrestrial laser scanners and mobile and airborne lidar, lead to new possibilities for interaction in design practice. And the images produced by these models have an uncanny aesthetic, prompting us to consider the environment in a new way.

Christophe Girot is Professor and Chair of Landscape Architecture in the Architecture Department of the ETH Zurich.

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His teaching and research interests span new topological methods in landscape design, landscape perception and analysis through new media, and contemporary theory and history of landscape architecture. His professional practice focuses on large-scale landscape projects, using advanced three-dimensional geographic information systems techniques that contribute to the design of more sustainable environments.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Archaeology of the Digital: Complexity and Convention.

Christophe Girot: Unravelling the Digital Landscape
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