Cities of Artificial Excavation: The Work of Peter Eisenman, 1978–1988 explores how American architect and writer Peter Eisenman questioned the concept of “site,” and demonstrates the importance of drawing and modelmaking in generating his ideas.

The exhibition reveals the richness and complexity of the design process by looking carefully at Eisenman’s drawings and models for four key works: the submission for the International Design Seminar in Cannaregio, Venice (1978); the submission to the South Friedrichstadt housing competition of the Internationale Bauausstellung, Berlin (1980-81); the project for the University Art Museum for California State University in Long Beach (1986); and the Chora L Works, a garden for the Parc de La Villette in Paris (1985-1986). Through drawings and models for these and related projects, the exhibition demonstrates how an investigation of “site” became a primary strategy for Eisenman, informing his proposals, his built work, and his ongoing criticism of the discipline of architecture.

Curator: Jean-François Bédard, CCA
Exhibition design: Peter Eisenman, New York

Publication
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