Michael Reynolds: The Earthship Sustainable Housing Concept

Talk, in English, Paul-Desmarais Theatre, 15 November 2007

In the Yesterday Today lecture series, American architect Michael Reynolds discusses Earthship houses, which use recycled materials and sustainable energy technologies to create autonomous dwellings. The structure and systems of Earthships are integrated so that all materials have a secondary use, from the greywater system in bathrooms and kitchens to planter boxes in which edible produce is grown.

Michael Reynolds is principal of Earthship Biotecture, based in Taos, New Mexico.

Yesterday Today is a lecture series investigating architectural ideas of the 1970s and today in light of environmental concerns. It is presented in conjunction with the CCA exhibition 1973: Sorry, Out of Gas (2007). The exhibition featured Reynolds’ Earthship concept as well as the Spinach House (1979) and Turbine House (1982) projects.

. . .
Michael Reynolds: The Earthship Sustainable Housing Concept
00:00:00
00:00:00
1
1

Sign up to get news from us

Email address
First name
Last name
By signing up you agree to receive our newsletter and communications about CCA activities. You can unsubscribe at any time. For more information, consult our privacy policy or contact us.

Thank you for signing up. You'll begin to receive emails from us shortly.

We’re not able to update your preferences at the moment. Please try again later.

You’ve already subscribed with this email address. If you’d like to subscribe with another, please try again.

Folder ()

Your folder is empty.

Email:
Subject:
Notes:
Please complete this form to make a request for consultation. A copy of this list will also be forwarded to you.

Your contact information
First name:
Last name:
Email:
Phone number:
Notes (optional):
We will contact you to set up an appointment. Please keep in mind that your consultation date will be based on the type of material you wish to study. To prepare your visit, we'll need:
  • — At least one week for primary sources (prints and drawings, photographs, archival documents, etc.)
  • — At least twenty-four hours for secondary sources (books, periodicals, vertical files, etc.)
...