One of the markers of modernity from the eighteenth century onwards is the emergence of “the people” as a respected political entity. In response, architects have advocated for the transformation of cities, explored new technologies, pioneered design discourses, and engaged in heated cultural conflicts—all in the name of the people. During this time, fictional, abstracted versions of the people figured more frequently in visual representations of architecture. This is especially evident in contemporary renderings populated by digitally composed crowds, but these are only the most recent manifestation of a long visual tradition.

Starting from… People seeks to explore the relation of the human body and its generic silhouette within architectural representations. The selection of drawings, sketches, and collages from the CCA collection focuses on the inclusion of human figures to evoke specific qualities in projects.

The Starting From… series explores current publications on architecture and highlights materials in the CCA collection.

Selected objects
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