Do Not Come Any Closer

Talk, in English, Paul-Desmarais Theatre, 29 November 2012 , 7pm

Since 1997 Czech artist Barbora Šlapetová has made several expeditions to remote settlements in the jungles of Papua New Guinea with her colleague Lukáš Rittstein. The documentation of such visits and the dialogues they have prompted, including one with Czech premier Vaclav Havel, yielded books such as Why the Night is Black and Do Not Come Any Closer and several exhibitions including one at the Czech pavilion at Expo 2010 in Shanghai.Šlapetová’s work is a complex testimony of an often easily romanticised world. Rather than contributing to the myth of the primitive forest dweller at peace with his surroundings, her work confronts the spirituality of the jungle and addresses nostalgia for the disappearing forest, examining the issue through the symbolism of contemporary art. In this presentation she sets the way she views the forest in the wider context of her work. It is presented in conjunction with the exhibition First, the Forests.

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