Learning from... Tongzhou

Talk, in English, Paul Desmarais Theatre, 10 April 2014 , 6pm

It has been standard Chinese urban policy to develop new towns in overpopulated metropolitan regions since the 1990s. This lecture by Jing Zhou takes the case of Tongzhou near Beijing as an example of the resulting mixture of planned and unplanned urban development.Tongzhou town was first planned as a satellite town in the 1950s and founded on a historic harbour town. Its rapid transformation was prompted by a series of market-driven policies throughout the 1990s and 2000s after several decades of state planning.

This lecture compares this situation to Almere, one of the largest new towns in the Netherlands, and will argue that modernist planning has been ineffective in creating the spatial and social diversity necessary for a vital new town.Jing Zhou studied architecture and urban planning at Tianjin University and holds a master of urbanism from the Delft University of Technology.

The Learning from… series takes its title from Learning from Las Vegas (1972), Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Steven Izenour’s influential publication, which analysed the commercial strips and architectural symbolism of Las Vegas in order to understand urban sprawl. In this spirit, the series brings together experts to explore specific urban conditions and their relevance to the future development of cities.

Pause
00:00:00
00:00:00
1
1

Sign up to get news from us

Email address
First name
Last name
By signing up you agree to receive our newsletter and communications about CCA activities. You can unsubscribe at any time. For more information, consult our privacy policy or contact us.

Thank you for signing up. You'll begin to receive emails from us shortly.

We’re not able to update your preferences at the moment. Please try again later.

You’ve already subscribed with this email address. If you’d like to subscribe with another, please try again.

Folder ()

Your folder is empty.

Email:
Subject:
Notes:
Please complete this form to make a request for consultation. A copy of this list will also be forwarded to you.

Your contact information
First name:
Last name:
Email:
Phone number:
Notes (optional):
We will contact you to set up an appointment. Please keep in mind that your consultation date will be based on the type of material you wish to study. To prepare your visit, we'll need:
  • — At least one week for primary sources (prints and drawings, photographs, archival documents, etc.)
  • — At least twenty-four hours for secondary sources (books, periodicals, vertical files, etc.)
...