Fr

Centring Africa: Postcolonial Perspectives on Architecture

Georg Lippsmeier, photographer. Image from slide, National Printing Press, Nouakchott, Mauritania, ca. 1971. Georg Lippsmeier Collection, CCA. ARCH280728. Gift of African Architecture Matters

In 2018 the Canadian Centre for Architecture launched a collaborative and multidisciplinary research project on architecture’s complex developments in sub-Saharan African countries after independence. The architecture practice and discipline, along with academic institutions, archives, libraries, and museums, have been integral to what Valentin-Yves Mudimbe calls “the invention of Africa” by the West. This project therefore asks, first, how to understand architecture’s historical role in decolonization, neocolonialism, globalization, and their manifestations across the continent, at local and regional scales; and, second, how this understanding can challenge established methods and disciplinary conventions of architectural and urban studies. “Centring Africa: Postcolonial Perspectives on Architecture” seeks to contextualize such seemingly paradoxical relations as those among building and unbuilding, formal and informal, appropriated and expropriated, and modern and traditional. The project aims to question, and eventually shift, perspectives shaped by North/South knowledge divides.

With funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the CCA will direct an eighteen-month project to analyze and historicize the ways in which architecture manifests transformations in post-independence African countries. The grants will support original, case-based research on concrete projects, actors, architectural typologies, key geographies, or urban developments that explore the history of architecture’s agency in sub-Saharan Africa.

This research initiative is catalyzed in part by the recent arrival at the CCA of three important archival collections related to architecture, urbanism, and territoriality in Africa: those of Dutch planner Coen Beeker, German architect Georg Lippsmeier, and Kiran Mukerji, an employee of Lippsmeier. Together, these archives form a unique research library of nearly three thousand titles, which will serve as an investigative starting point for the studies developed, individually or collectively, in the framework of a new Mellon project as part of the CCA Multidisciplinary Research Program. Generally, the CCA considers archival research essential to building new forms of evidence, understanding the archive broadly, even as one which still needs to be constructed. Specifically, this project reconsiders the archive in order to challenge the reliance on Western sources by looking beyond institutional archives to others constructed around single buildings, international organizations, urban spaces, new policies, statistics, laws, photography, financial programs, and philosophical, intellectual, or cultural propositions.

Selection process

“Centring Africa: Postcolonial Perspectives on Architecture” will unfold in two phases. Following an open call for applications, the CCA has invited sixteen shortlisted applicants to participate in a Mellon Seminar to collect ideas and discuss the scope and urgency of such a project. Shortlisted applicants will present their research projects and debate the conceptual terms and the methodological structures for conceptualizing African architecture’s agency through history writing. The multiday Mellon Seminar will be held in an African City in the spring of 2019 with all sixteen shortlisted applicants. Second, through a peer-review evaluation process eight applicants will be selected to participate in the research project.

The eight selected Mellon Researchers will reconvene in the fall of 2019 to begin their eighteen-month engagement with the Mellon Research Project on “Centring Africa: Postcolonial Perspectives on Architecture,” meeting regularly in Montreal, and will continue the work through the winter of 2021.

Shortlisted applicants

Doreen Adengo proposes to document the modernist architecture of Kampala, Uganda, and its post-occupancy adaptations from the perspective of the local user. Adengo is the principal of Adengo Architecture.

Dele Adeyemo’s proposal takes the modernist new town and harbour at Tema, Ghana, as a case study to research how the emergence of logistics, as a networked spatial system, has governed urbanization in Africa. Adeyemo is a doctoral student at the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths, University of London.

Tomà Berlanda’s proposal surveys the projects nominated in the first three cycles of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture and the influence of the Award in defining a contemporary African architecture. Berlanda is a professor at the School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics, University of Cape Town.

Caitlin Blanchfield proposes to research Cuba’s La Unión de Empresas Constructoras Caribe program in Angola, Mozambique, and Ethiopia as an example of South-South exchange. Blanchfield is a doctoral candidate at Columbia University.

Warebi Gabriel Brisibe and Ramota Obagah-Stephen propose to study the courtyard houses built on formerly segregated land in Old Port-Harcourt Town during Nigeria’s late- and postcolonial periods as an architectural form of creolization. Brisibe is a senior lecturer and Obagah-Stephen is a lecturer at Rivers State University.

Simon De Nys-Ketels proposes to trace how architects sought to carve out a professional niche in hospital construction within an institutional constellation heavily imprinted by Cold-War politics in African development projects. De Nys-Ketels is a PhD candidate at Ghent University.

Robby Fivez’s starts from traces in the colonial archive of the former Belgian Congo to relocate the epistemological origins of the technique of lime burning from Europe to Africa, showing how this predecessor of cement has a long-standing tradition on the African continent that lasts into the present. Fivez is a PhD candidate at Ghent University.

Ayala Levin’s proposal investigates the planning of the Nigerian capital of Abuja at a territorial scale through its interdisciplinary teams of experts and the roles that Nigerian academics, architects, and universities assumed in the process. Levin is an Assistant Professor at Northwestern University.

Rachel Lee and Monika Motylinska propose to investigate a selection of the Institut für Tropenbau’s “social infrastructure” projects within the context of German foreign policies and Tanzanian and Senegalese agendas. Rachel Lee is a post-doctoral fellow at the Institute of Art History, Ludwig-Maximilian-University Munich, and Monika Motylinska is a postdoctoral researcher at the Leibniz Institute for Research on Society and Space.

Ikem Stanley Okoye’s proposal uses architecture in Nembe, Old Awka, Ibi, Little Popo, and Beau, Nigeria to ask how we can recognize African-produced, colonial-era modern architectures of the local. Okoye is an Associate Professor at the University of Delaware.

Mark Olweny’s proposed research explores architecture education in East Africa over the past 60 years to conceptualize the connection between architecture education and the African architecture canon. Olweny is Associate Dean at the Faculty of the Built Environment, Uganda Martyrs University.

Petros Phokaides proposes to research the United Nations’ Food and Agricultural Organization’s pilot project of water management in Kordofan, Sudan, to study the role of rural landscapes in postcolonial visions and developmental agendas. Phokaides is a researcher at the National Technical University of Athens and at the Mesarch Lab, University of Cyprus.

Cole Roskam’s proposal examines the history of China’s involvement on the African continent by the Chinese Communist Party’s efforts to redefine intermediacy as an empowering geopolitical position through African-Chinese architectural collaboration since 1949. Roskam is an Associate Professor of at the University of Hong Kong.

Lukasz Stanek proposes to study the Africanization of Ghanaian architecture through the architectural production and the curriculum building at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in Kumasi from 1952-1979. Stanek is a Senior Lecturer at the Manchester Architecture Research Centre, University of Manchester and Associate Visiting Professor at Taubman College, University of Michigan

Huda Tayob’s proposal examines the architecture of the Kumasi, Accra, Addis Ababa, and Dar es Salaam pan-African conferences between 1953 and 1974. Tayob is a teaching fellow at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London and lectures at the Graduate School of Architecture, University of Johannesburg.

Rixt Woudstra proposes research on the Commission for Technical Co-operation in Africa South of the Sahara and its conferences on the construction of large-scale housing estates as an instrument to prolong imperial rule through a policy of “stabilization.” Woudstra is a PhD candidate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

CCA Mellon Multidisciplinary Research Project

The CCA committee prepared the open call for applications and selected seminar participants with advisors to the project.

CCA Committee
• Mirko Zardini, CCA Director
• Giovanna Borasi, CCA Chief Curator
• Kim Förster, CCA Associate Director, Research

External advisors
• Johan Lagae, Ghent University, Belgium
• Taibat Lawanson, University of Lagos, Nigeria
• Ijlal Muzaffar, Rhode Island School of Design, USA
• Itohan Osayimwese, Brown University, USA

This is the CCA’s fourth Mellon Multidisciplinary Research Project; please click here for more information on the program.

1
1

Sign up to get news from us

Email address
First name
Last name
By signing up you agree to receive our newsletter and communications about CCA activities. You can unsubscribe at any time. For more information, consult our privacy policy or contact us.

Thank you for signing up. You'll begin to receive emails from us shortly.

We’re not able to update your preferences at the moment. Please try again later.

You’ve already subscribed with this email address. If you’d like to subscribe with another, please try again.

This email was permanently deleted from our database. If you’d like to resubscribe with this email, please contact us

Please complete the form below to buy:
[Title of the book, authors]
ISBN: [ISBN of the book]
Price [Price of book]

First name
Last name
Address (line 1)
Address (line 2) (optional)
Postal code
City
Country
Province/state
Email address
Phone (day) (optional)
Notes

Thank you for placing an order. We will contact you shortly.

We’re not able to process your request at the moment. Please try again later.

Folder ()

Your folder is empty.

Email:
Subject:
Notes:
Please complete this form to make a request for consultation. A copy of this list will also be forwarded to you.

Your contact information
First name:
Last name:
Email:
Phone number:
Notes (optional):
We will contact you to set up an appointment. Please keep in mind that your consultation date will be based on the type of material you wish to study. To prepare your visit, we'll need:
  • — At least one week for primary sources (prints and drawings, photographs, archival documents, etc.)
  • — At least twenty-four hours for secondary sources (books, periodicals, vertical files, etc.)
...